Dáil Éireann - Volume 630 - 31 January, 2007

Written Answers. - Residency Permits.

Mr. Perry asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform if he has made a decision on the renewal of the permission to remain in the State which a person (details supplied) has submitted; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [1992/07]

  Mr. McDowell: The person in question was granted permission to remain in the State on 24 February 2005 for two years under the revised arrangements announced by me on 15 January 2005 for non-national parents of Irish children born prior to 1 January 2005 and commonly referred to as the IBC/05 scheme.

Advertisements inviting applications for renewal of permission to remain granted under the IBC/05 scheme were placed in National Newspapers this morning 31 January, 2007.

[432] Applications must be made on the official IBC renewal form which sets out the requirements for renewal and which is available on my Department’s website (www.justice.ie). Hard copies of the form will also be available at the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS), 13-14 Burgh Quay, Dublin 2 and Garda District Headquarters stations outside Dublin. Forms will also be distributed to various non-governmental organisations working with immigrants and asylum seekers.

Applications for renewal for permission to remain granted in January, February or March 2005 must be submitted by post to the IBC Unit by 2 April 2007 at the latest. All other applications must be submitted one month in advance of the date on which the current permission to remain in the State expires.

Guidelines to assist applicants in making their application are available with the application form.

Ms Shortall asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform the options available to a foreign person who intends to marry an Irish citizen; the rights this person will be entitled to post-nuptials; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [2018/07]

  Mr. McDowell: There is no automatic entitlement to residency in the State for a non-EU national on the basis of marriage to an Irish national. However, I do consider applications which are made in writing to the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service of my Department for permission to remain in the State on this separate basis. If granted, the non-EU national will be entitled to reside in the State, work without the requirement of a work permit and operate a business in the State without applying for business permission from my Department.

A foreign national married to an Irish citizen for at least three years may apply for naturalisation under section 15A of the Irish Naturalisation and Citizenship Act 1956 as amended where they have been continuously resident on the island of Ireland for the year immediately prior to the date of their application and for two out of the four years prior to that year. The marriage concerned must be recognised under the laws of the State as subsisting.